Remaining CTA 2400s No Longer in Revenue Service

Chicago — November 6, 2014 — CTA is marking another milestone in the modernization of its rapid transit fleet.

Deliveries of the 5000 series cars had progressed by October 31, 2014, to the point that has allowed CTA to retire the last of its 2400-series cars from revenue service, a mere 15 months after final retirement of the 2200-series "L" cars.

The 2400-series cars were delivered by Boeing-Vertol beginning in the fall of 1976 and were christened by the first Mayor Daley two months before his death. Rail historians say that they were easily the most successful rail transit cars Boeing-Vertol produced during its short and troubled existence.

The 2400-series cars were seen all over the CTA rail system until this past year with one exception, the Orange Line, which oddly became their last revenue assignment, with the final 50 cars being removed after the morning rush on October 31. The lowest-numbered 2400s, with red-and-white stripes on the ends and belt rails, will remain indefinitely as work cars. That includes the 2404, which is the car Daley rode at the 2400s' official introduction.

The last of the controversial 5000-series "L" cars are scheduled to be delivered in 2015. CTA did not retire the 2400s until it had more than 550 of the 5000s on the property. Retirement came within weeks of CTA's release of specifications and a request for proposals for its 7000-series "L" cars, which would allow CTA to retire all DC motor cars by 2022.

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  CTA car 2508 at Adams/Wabash leads the last 2400-series revenue service run  
  On Friday, October 31, 2014, car 2508 at Adams/Wabash leads the last 2400-series revenue service run. Immediately after capturing the image, photographer Bruce Moffat ran as fast as he could to the opposite platform to board the train. The white streaks in the photo are snow; it was a very cold day.—Bruce G. Moffat photo
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  Upon arrival at 59th Street Midway Terminal, Graham Garfield (left) joins Bruce Moffat (right) in congratulating operator James Sheehan on bringing to a close the 38-year history of the only rapid transit cars operating in the United States that were built by an aircraft manufacturer, Boeing-Vertol  
  Upon arrival at 59th Street Midway Terminal, Graham Garfield (left) joins Bruce Moffat (right) in congratulating operator James Sheehan on bringing to a close the 38-year history of the only rapid transit cars operating in the United States that were built by an aircraft manufacturer, Boeing-Vertol. For now, 24 cars will be retained for work service.—Eddie Fisher photo
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